Thursday, September 21, 2017

THE HURRICANE STORY

Someone recently asked if anyone had a book about a hurricane. I wasn’t familiar with a book about a hurricane, but I decided to adapt my “Rainhat Story” to make a positive twist on a frightening experience for children. Hope you’ll enjoy sharing it with your class.
                              
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bAH8x6ULVeE&feature=em-upload_owner#action=share


Here’s a link to the original “Rainhat Story” so you can learn how to tell it. It’s one your children will want to hear over and over again.
                            
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1SnEagA4jljM1VPUU1RLXh2X2s/view?usp=sharing

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

ALLITERATION

Hooray!  Hooray!
It's Facebook Wednesday.
See you at Five this afternoon!

Which One Doesn't Belong?
Say a series of words that begin with the same sound. Say one word that does not begin like the others. Children listen and identify the word that does not belong. 
 For example: sun, sand, top, see (top); boy, house, big, ball (house)

Bappy Birthday
Sing the birthday song by inserting the first sound in the child’s name for each word. For example, Beth’s birthday song would be:
          Bappy birthday bo bou…

*You can also insert the sound that the child’s name begins with in “Tooty Ta” and “Batman.”

Hint! If their first name begins with a vowel, use the first sound of their last name or middle name.

Hand Phone
Have children cup one hand around their ear and the other hand in front of their mouth. The teacher says a series of words that begin with the same sound as the children repeat.

Marvelous Monday
Think of adjectives for the days of the week and months of the year. 
For example: Thrilling Thursday or Marvelous May.

Songs
Sing “Pepperoni Pizza”, “Bubble Gum”, and other songs where alliteration is emphasized.
          Pepperoni Pizza
          I like to eat, eat, eat,
          Pepperoni pizza.
          I like to eat, eat, eat,
          Pepperoni pizza.
          Bi bike bo beat, beat, beat
          Bepperoni bizza...
          Mi mike mo meat, meat, meat
          Mepperoni mizza…
          Li like lo leat, leat, leat,
          Lepperoni lizza…
          Ri rike ro reat, reat, reat,
          Repperoni rizza...
          Zi zike zo zeat, zeat, zeat,
          Zepperoni zizza...
          Yi yike yo yeat, yeat, yeat,
          Yepperoni yizza...

*Use this song for other consonants and vowels.

          Gumball
          I put a penny in the gum slot.
          I watched the gum roll down.
          I get the gum and you get the wrapper,
          Cause I put the penny in the gum slot.

Sing substituting the initial consonant sound of each word with “B,” “N,” “P,” “G,” “L,” and “F.”
                                
                       
Activities: Cut out paper gumball machines and write different letters from the song on 
them. Substitute other consonants, blends, and diagraphs in this song.







Tuesday, September 19, 2017

SYLLABICATION

You'll find reading skills today,
but PLAY ideas on Wednesday.
I'll see you then on Facebook LIVE
Don't be late - see you at FIVE!
Move It! 
Clap, hop, walk, or nod the syllables in children’s names and classroom objects. Disco, hula, swim, or march to syllables in rhymes and songs.

Hickety Pickety
Slowly clap hands to the beat as you say the chant below.
          Hickety, pickety bumblebee
          Who can say their name for me? Child’s name.
          Clap it. (Clap out syllables as you say the name.)
          Snap it. (Snap syllables in name.)
          Whisper it. (Whisper name.)
          No sound. (Lip sinc name.)

Instruments 

Have children beat out syllables with instruments. You could also use cardboard rollers, straws, pencils, etc. like drum sticks to tap out rhythms and syllables.

Syllable Show 
Slowly say a word. Children hold up the number of syllables they hear on their fingers.
                                 
*You could also let them show the number of syllables by placing the appropriate number of poker chips or popsicle sticks on their desk.

Mouth It

Have children gently place their palm under their chin and ask them repeat to words. Surprise! The mouth opens on each syllable (all syllables have vowels and the mouth opens).

Sound Sack
Take a small sack and fill it with common objects or small toys. Engage children’s attention with this song to the tune of “I’m a Little Teapot.”
What’s in the sound sack, who can tell?
Maybe it’s a book or maybe it’s a shell?
What’s in the sound sack, who can say?
Blend the sounds, you’ll know right away!
            
Choose an object and stretch out the sounds. When children can blend the sounds and say the word, remove it from the sack and place it on the floor. Before putting each item back in the bag, segment the sounds again.
*Start with compound words. When children are successful with that, use objects with two syllables. Finally, children will be able to blend individual phonemes.

Finger Tap 
Bend in your fingers and extend your thumb. Going from the left tap a finger for each sound with your thumb.
For example: /j/ /e/ /t/. Run your thumb over your fingers as you blend the sounds and say the word.

*You can do a similar activity by extending your left arm in front of you. Make the first sound as you touch your shoulder, the second sound as you touch the elbow, and the third sound as you touch the hand. Then quickly sweep the right hand down your left arm as you blend the sounds and say the word.


Monday, September 18, 2017

IT'S PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS WEEK!

Phonological awareness is the ability to recognize sounds in oral language (rhyme, alliteration, syllables, etc.). Children must first hear the sounds before they can relate them to letters (phonics). Let's start today with rhyming. Learning to rhyme doesn't happen it one lesson...it takes a lot of oral language (nursery rhymes, finger plays), songs, books, and games to help children develop this skill.

Rhyme Detectives

Tell the children that they will get to be detectives andlisten for words that rhyme. You say a word, and they put their pinkies up if they hear a word that rhymes with it. Pinkies down if it doesn’t rhyme.
For example: Cat - hat (pinkies up), run - dog (pinkies down).
      
Handy Rhymes 
Have children extend their arms as they say pairs of words that rhyme. For example: sun (extend right hand) - fun (extend left hand). As they progress, the teacher says a word as children extend their right hand.

Rhyming Song 
Do this activity to the tune of “Skip to My Lou.”
          Cat (hold out right hand)
          Hat (hold out left hand)
          Those words rhyme.
          Cat (hold out right hand)
          Hat (hold out left hand)
          Those words rhyme.
          Cat (hold out right hand)
          Hat (hold out left hand)
          Those words rhyme.
          They all end with “at.” (Roll hands around as you say this.)



Rhyme Puzzles 
Cut paper plates in half using puzzle designs similar to those shown. Glue pictures that rhyme on each half. Mix up the pieces. Children say the words and match up the plates that rhyme. The game is self-checking because the pieces will fit if they match the correct pictures. 
*You can also use season shapes to make a rhyming game.
                                                    
Rhyme Ball
You will need a ball, beanbag, or other object to toss for this game. Children sit or stand in a circle. The teacher says a word and then tosses the ball to a child. As the child catches the ball, she must say a word that rhymes.

Riddle Rhyme Game 
Let children make up their own rhymes in this game. First, they choose an object in the room. Next, they say a word that it rhymes, along with another clue. For example: “This rhymes with hair and it is something you sit on.” “This rhymes with look and it is something you read.”

Rhyme Bag
Give each child a lunch bag and for homework ask them to bring two objects that rhyme.  As they take turns sharing their items encourage classmates to think of other words that rhyme with their objects.
                                  

Join me for Facebook Live
This Wednesday at Five.
I've got fall ideas galore
and maybe even a little more!!


Sunday, September 17, 2017

GRANNY AT THE FAIR

Hope you can join me this Wednesday, 9/20,
for Facebook Live at Five!  It's going to be a fall festival of ideas!

In some areas of the country the county fair or state fair are an exciting event that comes once a year. However, your students will get a kick out of singing this song all year long. It's a great brain break - if you don't believe me just see how challenging it is for you to do it!!!
                                            
Granny at the Fair (Echo chant - children repeat each line.)
My granny went
To the county fair.
And she bought
A rocking chair. (Begin rocking back and forth.)
And she rocked, and she rocked, and she rocked, and she rocked.

And she bought a fan there... (Begin fanning yourself with right hand.)

And she bought some scissors there…(Cut with left hand.)

And she bought some gum… (Begin chewing.)

And she blew a bubble there…

And she blew, and she blew, and she blew, and POP! (Extend hands by mouth.)

                  
Here's my new video on youtube:

http://bit.ly/drjean_granny_fair

Saturday, September 16, 2017

ROCK ON!

"Collect Rocks Day" is September 16th, but rocks are everywhere every day. Rocks can be a perfect spark for scientific investigations if you add a little STEAM. When you collect rocks or look at rocks, explain that scientists who study rocks are called geologists. Remind the children that they can be geologists, too!
                          
Take a nature walk and invite each child to pick up ONE rock. You might need to limit the size to a rock that will fit in their hand. Take the rocks to the classroom and ask the children to observe their rock for one minute without talking. Go around the room and ask each child to make one statement about their rock. Encourage them to use descriptive words.

*Ask older children to write descriptions about their rocks.

*Place the rocks in a basket. Gently shake the rocks and then pass the basket around the class to see if each child can find his rock.

*Let the children sort the rocks. What was their sorting rule? Can they sort them another way?

*Check out a book on rocks from the library. Place it in the science center along with a magnifying glass. Ask the children to do research and identify the different rocks they collected. (Remind the children to return the rocks to nature after they have finished investigating them.)

*Are rocks older than you or younger than you?

*Make a list of all the things that rocks are used for. 


*Have children make a design and build something with rocks.

*Let children paint rocks or use other art media to make paperweights.

*Place rocks in the math center for children to explore with the balance scale.

*For homework, ask families to take a walk and look for different kinds of rocks in their neighborhood.

*Encourage children to start their own rock collection with this idea. Cut an egg crate in half. Attach a pipe cleaner handle and use it to collect little rocks and pebbles.

Friday, September 15, 2017

LET'S MAKE A HAT TODAY!

September 15th is “Make a Hat Day,” but kids love to make hats and wear hats any day of the year. Here are some ways that you can tie in hats with themes or skills you are working on.

Sentence Strip Hat 
Materials: sentence strips or heavy paper cut in 2 ½” x 24”, markers, crayons, stickers 
Directions: Let children decorate the sentence strip and then fit to their head and staple or tape in place. 

Children can write letters, numerals, or vocabulary words on the headband. Sure beats doing a worksheet and accomplishes the same thing! 
                         
Children can add ears or other details to create an animal from a story. Let them wear their hats to retell the story.  

*Wouldn’t this be more fun than a written book report?

How about an “all about me” headband? 

Children can make an autograph hat with friends’ names. 

If you cut a zigzag line on one side every child can be king or queen for the day! 
                        
Hint! Two brad fasteners and a rubber band will make the hat easier to adjust to the head, but it’s a lot more trouble. 

                                  HATS OFF TO YOU TODAY!